Paradigm Corporation

2011 UNITE Conference

Presentation materials from the May 2011 UNITE Conference in Garden Grove, California.

 

YouPortal (MCP-4002)

Abstract Between the rise of web-based user interfaces and the need to provide better access to the data and applications that reside on mainframe systems has come the concept of the "portal." A portal is nothing more than a way to connect an external user interface technology (in this case HTML/HTTP) to a communications technology that mainframe programs and programmers are comfortable with (say, COMS). Portals also help separate the user interface from the business rules and data of an application—always a good thing to try to do.

There are a number of portal-based products available for the MCP environment that provide facilities to support this concept, but the basic mechanism is quite simple, and MCP systems have for some years provided everything we need to construct a portal. It's just not all that difficult to do it yourself.

The speaker will describe one such portal mechanism he has built to integrate user interfaces written in ASP.Net to MCP COMS applications written in COBOL-85. Topics will include configuration of the portal mechanism, data representation and formatting, design of the ASP.Net and COBOL applications, reuse of existing code, support for testing and debugging, and lessons learned. Source code for the portal mechanism and a small sample application will be available for download after the presentation.

Presenter Paul Kimpel
Slides & Notes Presentation slides and notes as Adobe Acrobat .PDF (162 KB)
Resources The source and example files used with the presentation, all contained in a single ZIP archive file. (324 KB)
Revised 2012-01-20 to include DASDL source.
 

Lights-Out Automation for a Small MCP Shop (MCP-4001)

Abstract It used to be that if you had a computer system, you had to have a staff to operate it. Over time, though, the need to have someone sit with the system all of the time and feed it work has gradually diminished. First, the night shifts went away when large-capacity backup media and robotic libraries did away with the need to have someone hang around to hang tapes. Then as more user interfaces have moved totally on-line and printing has become network-based, the role of the operator has largely been reduced to sitting around waiting for a problem to happen and knowing who to call when it does. Most small shops cannot afford this.

The speaker will discuss a small MCP shop with which he has worked for several years that has no MCP operations or software expertise on site, and obtains all its application and MCP support remotely from contractors. Not only that, the Libra itself sits in a locked room 60 miles away from the main office and the majority of its users, largely ignored by the resident network and Windows server admin.

The speaker will describe how MCP system administration and operation are handled at this site. Topics in this presentation will include a sketch of the customer's application and network environment, disk backup, disk space management, printing, automated job scheduling, remote system monitoring, MCP administration and update, and provisions for disaster recovery. The speaker will also describe how standard MCP facilities and a few home-grown tools are used to support operations and monitor the site.

Presenter Paul Kimpel
Slides & Notes Presentation slides and notes as Adobe Acrobat .PDF (214 KB)
Resources The source and example files used with the presentation, all contained in a single ZIP archive file. (149 KB)

 


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